Saturday, March 14, 2020

Lockdown Day Books

Israel is well on the way to total lockdown for all nonessential outings. As of tomorrow only food shops, pharmacies, banks, limited public transport, and other essential services and industries will be working. Gatherings are limited to no ore than 10 people.

I was taught about keeping a Day Book when I first worked in an office over 30 years ago. It's basically a record of everything you do each day. To avoid five weeks of watching Netflix in our pyjamas, DD and I both have Day Books. The idea is that you don't just tick the boxes, rather you write a record of what you did.

As I said yesterday, DD will have assignments from school and I have assignments to set and receive but we also need a loose schedule to keep us on the straight wavy and narrow. One rule will be getting up at 7 am, getting dressed and making our beds. (My morning routine will include a load of laundry, drinking coffee and checking the news.) And at the end of the day it will be into bed at 10 (or 11 for me). Otherwise we'll end up turning day into night and night into day like a couple of student flatmates.

After that morning routine, 8 - 12 am will be work time - for both of us. Lunch at noon and if allowed, a walk to the park. If we're not allowed to go to the park we'll have lunch on the balcony. Thank God for the balcony!

2 - 6 pm activities include a bit of housework and Pesach cleaning, watching a documentary, and reading (both of us), art work (DD), recorder or piano, blogging, building committee stuff, decluttering and editing my digital life (all me), and anything else we can think of.

Supper at 6, games, screen time, reading and whatever from 7 - 10 and then bed.

Somehow I seem to have missed out the hours where I write my novel and learn French but maybe it comes under 'whatever'. Whatever.

Update: it's 2 minutes to midnight and DD has just informed me that we're getting up at 8 not 7. *sighs* I think we'll play it by ear from week to week.


2 comments:

  1. I did something similar when I first retired (and before I went back to PT work) as I did fear that I'd turn into a total sloth - and it did help. But a bit of flexibility is always wise.
    More things are shutting down by the hour and all Canadians have been told - don't travel outside the country - and if you are overseas, Come Home NOW!

    Social isolation is happening more and more just because there isn't much to do or to go too!
    A friend and I were some of the last few people in the museum on Friday afternoon - it was very quiet and when we went to pick up our coats we were told that they'd just got word to shut down.
    I will go to the office tomorrow but I anticipate much fewer hours for the next few weeks. I could do some work from home but not on my home laptop as I use very specialized software programs. They are experimenting with connecting in from home but it seems to be a bit hit or miss. At least I travel (via the subway) during off hours - after morning rush hour and before evening rush hour and things are a lot quieter than normal - plus with schools closed down there will be even less people.
    I do plan on some walks along the river - just across the street - and even through a large park that is nearby - lots of space between people.
    I have a list of things to do at home - a ton of books to read - Netflix and even some exercise videos on Youtube so that I can get some walking done even in my apt.!
    Hope you and DD don't go too stir crazy!

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    1. My bus ride to school yesterday (only to clear my desk and locker) took 25 minutes instead of the usual 45 minutes. We have enough space that I don't think we'll go stir crazy but DD's homework is putting a lot of pressure on us because neither of us are great with the Hebrew.

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